One of the highlights for me while in Washington, D.C., was visiting the United States Botanical Garden. It was a hot day, but I was encouraged by all the other like-minded people taking in the surroundings. I came to discover that much of the mall is landscaped with plants used to enhance the environment. Function and beauty are common from today’s planned landscape.

Join me on Saturday, July 20 as I present about fragrant shrubs for the planned landscape. Blueville Nursery at 4539 Anderson Ave. will be the host site. The program begins at 10 a.m.

Plants will enhance the environment’s ability to clean air and water, reduce flooding, combat climate change and provide all the other natural benefits that support life on Earth. Selecting which ones to use can be based on color, texture, form and fragrance. Roses are a good example of plants selected for two or more characteristics like color and fragrance.

Nothing really compares to the spring smell of Viburnum and lilac. There are still a few shrubs that have something to offer in summer and fall. My Caroline Allspice shrub has been blooming for quite a while. It has maroon-colored flowers on an 8-by-8-foot shrub. Blooms appear on last year’s growth and new growth.

Perhaps the most common summer flowering shrubs with a delightful fragrance are the Butterfly Bushes. There are numerous cultivars to choose from. I have tried many of them. My best success has been with the older, proven cultivars. They come in many colors and sizes.

Selecting and installing plants that are adapted to site conditions, climate and garden design require fewer resources and less maintenance to thrive. As wilderness shrinks and suburban acreage increases, what we plant in our home gardens is increasingly important. You may check out more on landscape for life at https://landscapeforlife.org/.

If you would like additional information on a horticulture topic, please contact Gregg Eyestone at the Riley County office of K-State Research and Extension.

Gregg may be contacted by calling 537-6350 or stopping by 110 Courthouse Plaza in Manhattan or e-mail: geyestone@ksu.edu and see the blog at www.riley.ksu.edu.

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