The abundant moisture this year has made plants thrive. That includes the weeds.

My crabgrass, morning glory and spurge are large and healthy. Foxtail has invaded my buffalograss lawn. These summer annuals will start to decline as the temperature drops this fall with death happening at frost.

Now is the time to focus on the cool-season weeds. Henbit, chickweed, downy brome, dandelion and speedwell are a few of my fall and early spring weeds. Two of my most aggravating ones are bedstraw and hedge parsley. These like to cling to clothing, tools, shoe strings and just about everything else.

One strategy for managing weeds is using a pre-emergence herbicide. It is fairly common practice in the spring. Now is the time to apply for the cool-season germinating weeds. Fall seeding and planting is likely not possible when using the herbicides. Read and follow product label directions.

Pre-emegence herbicides will inhibit the establishment of the weed.

There usually will be a few weeds that still grow. The use of a post-emergence herbicide could be the next option. Spot treating the active young weeds is common practice in early October. The ideal temperature is between 65 and 80 degrees.

Post-emergence herbicides are applied to the foliage. The weeds should be actively growing at treatment. Stubborn weeds may require a second treatment in one to two weeks.

When in the lawn, avoid mowing several days before and after treating for more leaf surface to come in contact with the product.

Treat when rain is not expected for 24 hours after application.

Avoid watering for several days after the application.

Pulling and cultivation is an alternative to the use of an herbicide. Unfortunately, this usually brings more weed seeds to life. Sometimes it is easiest just to put up with them.

You can find out more information on this and other horticulture topics by going to the Riley County, K-State Research and Extension website at www.riley.ksu.edu. Gregg may be contacted by calling 785-537-6350 or stopping by 110 Courthouse Plaza in Manhattan or e-mail: geyeston@ksu.edu.

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