Fighting a 12.3% decline in enrollment in the last five years, K-State has hired Karen Goos as the university’s vice provost for enrollment management.

Goos will lead the university’s implementation of its multiyear strategic enrollment plan, which will seek to turn around a trend of declining enrollment at K-State since a 2014 peak of 24,766 students.

The Board of Regents announced fall enrollment statistics for its universities on Wednesday, and K-State’s enrollment was 21,719 students, down 2.3% since last year and 12.3% since the 2014 peak.

“With her strong background in enrollment management, Dr. Goos will be tasked with providing strategic leadership and vision to all aspects of enrollment management at K-State, including domestic and international student recruitment, financial aid, registration and transfer enrollment,” Provost Charles Taber said.

In addition to implementing the university’s strategic enrollment plan, Goos also will be responsible for the university’s marketing position and leading K-State’s enrollment management organization.

“With her strong background in enrollment management, Dr. Goos will be tasked with providing strategic leadership and vision to all aspects of enrollment management at K-State, including domestic and international student recruitment, financial aid, registration and transfer enrollment,” Taber said.

Goos starts Nov. 18 and will earn a salary of $200,000.

Goos’s previous experience includes a stint as associate vice provost for enrollment management at the University of Central Missouri. Her work led to a 4% increase in freshman student retention, 2% increase in transfer student retention and a 6% increase in graduation rates.

Prior to that, Goos served in several positions at different campuses with Metropolitan Community College in Missouri. She was dean of student development and enrollment management, associate vice chancellor of student development and enrollment management, associate dean of student development and enrollment management, registrar, enrollment services manager and college relations coordinator.

Her education includes a bachelor’s degree in elementary and middle school education from Doane College, a master’s degree in exercise science-athletic administration from the University of Central Missouri, and a doctorate in educational leadership and policy analysis from the University of Missouri.

In September, Taber pointed to four reasons for K-State’s enrollment decline: fewer Kansas high school students are going on to higher education, fewer international students are coming to the country, fewer transfer students and increasing college tuition.

At his State of the University address, President Richard Myers said it is the university’s goal to return to an enrollment of about 24,000 students, which he said the university has handled and is built for.

He and Taber have said that the university’s enrollment plan will pursue more out-of-state and international students, and the K-State community won’t see the effects of that plan until fall 2020.