A first-time meeting with her alleged rapist was not intended to include sex, a woman who worked as an escort at the time said Tuesday at a trial for a Manhattan man charged with multiple sex offenses.

Tommie Baggett, 18, is charged with one count of rape, three counts of attempted rape, one count of criminal sodomy, one count of aggravated criminal sodomy, one count of aggravated robbery, three counts of aggravated burglary and three counts of aggravated battery.

Baggett was linked by DNA to four alleged sexual assaults that occurred from August 2016 to March 2017.

The alleged victims, all women, were identified by name in Riley County District Court. The Mercury typically does not report the names of sexual violence victims.

The trial began Monday before Chief Judge Meryl Wilson. The first victim, who said she was raped in August 2016, testified in court Tuesday morning.

The woman said she had recently taken up escorting to earn extra income when she met her attacker through a dating app. She said while some people may associate escorting with sex work, there is no guarantee of sex. She said she understood escorting as financial compensation for dating and companionship, such as attending an event with a client.

Escorting, or paying someone for their time, is legal according to Kansas law, but explicitly paying someone for sexual acts — prostitution — is not.

The woman said she agreed to meet a man in Manhattan early on a rainy morning, and when she couldn’t find the address he texted her, she agreed to meet him at a nearby park.

She said she thought they would just talk and get to know each other, but they had not discussed money or what they expected of one another. They talked briefly under a shelter at the park, and then the woman said the man punched her in the face, and he instructed her to perform oral sex on him before raping her.

The woman said she did not consent to any of the actions. She said the man then took her phone and her keys, stole about $200 from her car and reset her phone to delete messages, apps, contacts and more. She said the man then left the scene.

The woman said when she spoke to police that day, she was not initially forthcoming. Defense attorney Jeffery Adam said during her first interview with police, she did not reveal she was an escort, did not accurately disclose what city she was coming from (Junction City), did not consent to a sexual assault exam and did not allow police to search her vehicle.

The woman said she wanted to protect friends and did not want to have an invasive exam done after the traumatic experience. She also said she didn’t want the vehicle searched because it was newer and did not belong to her.

“I was afraid of involving my friends (who suggested escorting), the perception surrounding (escorting) and how it would affect people taking me seriously,” she said.

Police collected some evidence from the victim, but the case went unsolved.

Deputy Riley County Attorney Bethany Fields outlined the other three incidents during the trial on Monday.

In February 2017, the second and third victims, who were roommates at the time, had spent the day at a house party before going to Aggieville that night with friends. Witnesses testified the women had been drinking on and off throughout the day and evening.

The second victim came home first, alone, and a sober roommate woke up to let her inside the locked house. The roommate said she awoke again to let the third victim inside when she returned from Aggieville.

The second victim said during the trial that she woke up during the night to a man beside her in bed. She said they exchanged small talk for a short while as she tried to figure out who he was, and the man moved on top of her, choked her and covered her mouth to stop her from yelling. The second victim said she fought back, hit a part of his face and he left her room.

She said she went downstairs to find the friend she had gone out with — the third victim — and the friend seemed “disoriented.” The second victim said she could see marks on her friend’s neck and a popped blood vessel in her eye. The two concluded they had suffered the same experience, and they called the police.

Although the women in the house said they took precautions after the incident, such as changing the locks on doors, another incident involving the same man took place about a month later on the evening of Fake Patty’s Day in March 2017, Fields said.

Fields said a man had entered the residence through a basement window that night and went in the room of a different roommate, the fourth victim.

The fourth victim said Monday she had been drinking intermittently that day, but didn’t recall meeting any strangers or inviting anyone over to the house. She said she woke up that night to a man standing over her. She said he asked if they would have sex now because she said she would. The woman said she did not recognize the man and refused.

When she turned her light on, she said the man tried strangling her but fled after she fought back.

Fields said DNA evidence collected from the women in each case matched the eventual DNA profile collected from Baggett, who was arrested in 2018 for possession of marijuana.

“The probability of another male with the same DNA profile is (very low),” Fields said.

Baggett’s defense attorney, Jeffery Adam, said statements from the alleged victims were not reliable.

He pointed out that the first victim did not tell police the whole story when she spoke to police initially and that when a detective questioned the first victim, he confronted her about the fact that one would need the phone’s passcode to reset the device. The first victim did not agree with this assessment based on what she’d seen.

Adam said the second and third victims had also been drinking the day of the incident, and none of the victims identified Baggett as the assailant in a police photo lineup.

Police who collected evidence from the home after the March incident found an unknown glove and sock in the basement bathroom, which none of the roommates recognized. They also found a slightly ajar window above the kitchen sink with disturbed dust and a partial footprint around it. Detectives also discovered footprints in the snow outside the home.

The trial continued Tuesday afternoon.