subscribe
Overcast

35°



County mulls $9.9M system

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

Riley County commissioners voted Thursday to move forward with negotiations on a $9.

Read More ...

This page and other exclusive local content require a subscription.

K-State dedicates building to former provost Beth Unger

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

The Unger Complex is officially part of the K-State campus.

Read More ...

This page and other exclusive local content require a subscription.

3 K-State students diagnosed with mumps virus

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

A mumps outbreak has reached K-State.

Read More ...

This page and other exclusive local content require a subscription.

USD 383 Board: Cash needed for diversity issues

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

While all members of the Manhattan-Ogden school board want to do more to address diversity issues in the school district, they run into a familiar problem — money.

Read More ...

This page and other exclusive local content require a subscription.

KSU creates multicultural center planning group

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

K-State will begin planning for a multicultural center on campus.

K-State Provost April Mason and Pat Bosco, vice president for student life, said Thursday the university has appointed a planning group of faculty and staff members, students and alumni to work with the university leadership to begin the process of building a center.

The charge to the planning group is to recommend a vision, purpose statement and plan that the KSU Foundation can use for a feasibility study and case statement development. The group also is charged to honor the work completed previously, using it as a starting point for further planning. The planning group will: • Review the original
conceptual work, gather information, and review similar models at peer institutions.

- Address the questions raised by donors and others related to the use, outcomes, budget and staff for the center.
• Invite broad participation of stakeholders across the university — student organizations, faculty groups, department, units, any group that wishes to participate — to address key planning questions.
• Engage individual donors, corporate diversity and inclusion experts and others to bring additional perspectives to the effort.
• Based on the feedback received, complete recommendations in May.

Along with Mason and Bosco, President Richard Myers appointed Zelia Wiley, interim provost for diversity, and Greg Willems, CEO and president of KSU Foundation, to serve as senior leadership for the project.

In November, Myers said in a letter to the K-State community he met with multicultural student groups to discuss the possibility of the center. Several of the groups had previously requested the facility to be constructed on campus.

In the letter, Myers said the university would take a “more intentional approach” to securing funding and constructing the facility. He said the creation of the facility relied on private funding and meetings with possible donors focused on specific questions on the facility instead of contributing money.

Results of the planning group’s work will be used to raise support and resources to construct the facility, Mason and Bosco said in Thursday’s announcement.

VERNON LERAY BARNES

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

Vernon LeRay Barnes, 81, of Wamego, died Monday, Feb.

Read More ...

This page and other exclusive local content require a subscription.

PATRICIA BRETTELL

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

Patricia Anne (Taylor) Brettell, 92, died peaceful ly on Sunday, Feb.

Read More ...

This page and other exclusive local content require a subscription.

MORRIS HOLLOWAY JR.

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

Morris Luther “Tip” Hol loway Jr.

Read More ...

This page and other exclusive local content require a subscription.

LAWRENCE MULLER

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

Lawrence Dale “Clancy” Muller, 80, of Blaine, died Monday, February 20, 2017.

Read More ...

This page and other exclusive local content require a subscription.

Engineering initiative boosts enrollment, graduates at KU

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

Associated Press

LAWRENCE - Sam Viron knew coming out of high school that she wanted to major in engineering, and had her heart set on leaving Kansas to do it. But when she visited the University of Kansas, just a few weeks before she had to pick a school, Viron said its brand new facilities and a scholar ship that provides money with a mentoring pro gram blew her away.

“How could I say no to something like this?” Viron, a sophomore from Olathe, told the Lawrence Journal-World. “I really had a hard time .nding any school that topped the facilities and resources we have here at KU.” Attracting more students like Viron and, ultimately, graduating them is the goal of the 10-year, $105 million University Engineering Initiative Act. The act aims to increase engineering degrees at KU, Kansas State and Wichita State to a total of 1,365 annually by 2021.

Engineering enroll ment at KU has grown in a big way - from 1,898 in 2012 to 2,381 in 2016, according to figures released in January by the Kansas Board of Regents. Less than .ve years into the act, KU has met and exceeded its targeted number of grad uates, according to the Regents.

“Halfway in, we’ve already surpassed that goal,” KU engineering dean Michael Branicky said. “We hope to continue to produce beyond that goal number all the way through.” Each of the three uni versities gets $3.5 million per year in state legislative appropriations under the act, starting in 2012, according to the Regents. The schools are matching that money dollar for dollar, so over the life of the act schools will have bolstered engineering programs by more than $200 million.

At KU, the state money has primarily gone toward constructing two new facilities and hiring enough new faculty to keep up with rising enrollment, Branicky said.

The Learned Engineering Expansion Phase 2, known as LEEP2, opened in August 2015. The state-of-the-art $65 million, 110,100-squarefoot building - now the centerpiece of KU’s engineering complex on 15th Street - is connected to Learned Hall, Spahr Library, Eaton Hall and the Measurement, Materials and Sustainable Environment Center (M2SEC).

The other building enabled by the state act is the 25,000-squarefoot Structural Testing and Student Projects Facility on West Cam pus, which opened in fall 2014. The building included a 40-foot-high strong wall and two 20 ton cranes, dedicated to large-scale structures research.

“The facilities play a large role in attracting students here, and the ability to have more faculty allows us to teach the drastically increased number of students,” Branicky said.

Enrollment has in creased across the board, Branicky said, though categories that seem to be growing faster than others are mechanical, chemical, petroleum and computer science.

WPD: Woman reported missing found safe

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

A Wamego woman reported missing was found in the Manhattan area around midday Wednesday, according to the Wamego Police Department. Becky Walton, 37, had last been seen at her home on Sunday and was reported miss ing by her family on Tuesday. Riley County police found Walton in the 1600 block of Fair Lane Wednesday and arrest ed her on a Pottawat omie County warrant for failure to appear. She was con.ned at the Riley County jail as of Thursday morning.

Kansas House advances Medicaid expansion

Send flowers to the family from Steve's Floral

Associated Press

TOPEKA — The Kansas House on Wednesday advanced a bill expanding Medicaid to more low-income, non-elderly adults, a proposal that was denied votes and floor debates for four years.

The measure passed a first-round House vote 83-40 and was to see final action Thursday.

The bill would expand the state’s Medicaid program, KanCare, to between 100,000 and 200,000 people ages 19 to 64 who earn up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level, about $16,000 for a single person. Under current law, the federal government will pay 94 percent of the cost and step down to 90 percent by 2020.

Supporters won the decisive initial victory arguing the expansion would be budget- neutral, support struggling health care providers and increase access to care. They pointed to other states, including several with Republican governors, that the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation says saw positive economic effects.

The legislation passed the first round as Congress is considering changes to the Affordable Care Act, including phasing out the funding for Medicaid expansion. The Kansas House bill includes a provision that would end the program if the federal government decreases funding below 90 percent.

Republican Rep. Susan Concannon, of Beloit, carried the issue to the House floor after a Medicaid expansion bill was tabled in the chamber’s health committee. She attached the contents as an amendment to another bill.

The expansion measure could have died because of an upcoming deadline for bills to pass their chamber of origin. Concannon said expansion legislation hasn’t been allowed votes in past years, and that a change in leadership has been the difference.

Supporters said expanding Medicaid would increase access to care using mostly federal funds. They argued the increased access means patients will get primary care, decreasing expensive emergency health care costs and uncompensated care costs that hospitals incur when they treat uninsured patients.

Concannon, who serves as vice chair of the health committee, said the state shouldn’t expect providers to “bear the brunt” of the state having not expanded Medicaid.

“We have got to get a system in place in Kansas where we can pay them for the work they are doing,” she said.

Several providers testified before the committee earlier this month and said they were struggling or laying off employees because of uncompensated care costs and cuts to the payments they receive for treating Medicare and Medicaid patients. They said expansion could offset those losses.

Opponents argued the expansion would be costly. They cited a state estimate on the original expansion bill that said it would cost Kansas nearly $69 million over the next two fiscal years after accounting for program revenue.

They also said the state shouldn’t expand Medicaid because if the federal government eliminates funding for the program, the state will be left to either take away coverage or fund a much larger portion of the program.

There is a Medicaid expansion bill in the Senate Public Health and Welfare Committee, but it hasn’t gotten a hearing.





Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | The Manhattan Mercury, 318 North 5th Street, Manhattan, Kansas, 66502 | Copyright 2017