Books

  • French siblings resist Germans during WWII

    “The Nightingale” is a superbly written story of two sisters who fight Germans in World War II in different but admirable ways.  One of the sisters, Vianne Mauriac, lives with her husband and young daughter Sophie in the village .

  • Spring is the season for baseball at the local library Keri.mills

    With spring just around the corner, that means it is once again time for baseball, the American pastime. To get yourself ready, or just to impress your friends with your vast knowledge, why not read up on the history of .

  • ‘Small Victories’ argues for the importance of offering forgiveness

    If you are familiar with Anne Lamott’s works, you either embrace most of her thoughts and opinions on assorted subjects and concerns, or you shake your head and contemplate her sanity. Then again, Lamott would be the first to .

  • Book examines Lincoln’s role in war for public opinion

    We are accustomed to our newspapers having two separate kinds of content: the unbiased news which presents the facts of both sides of an event or issue; and opinions, where the editor, readers, columnists and the like, present their own .

  • ‘Saint Brigid’s Bones’ journeys to sixth century Ireland

    This is a nice mystery involving Christians and Druids in the sixth century in what is now Ireland. Its protagonist is Sister Deidre, who is in probably in her 20s. She joined the convent after her young son died and .

  • Upcoming library events include baseball, Dickens Susan.withee.librarian1

    What do Internet safety, the Kansas City Monarchs, Manhattan history, Charles Dickens and great books for sale all have in common? They’re all at Manhattan Public Library in the month of March. Last weekend, the Manhattan Library Association (the .

  • ‘Dog Whistle Politics’ examines the language of race

    The author is the John H. Boalt, professor of law at the University of California-Berkeley and the author of two previous books on racism and the law. He is a graduate of Harvard Law School. This is an important work, .

  • ‘The Girl on the Train’ spins complex web

    For a debut novel, “The Girl on the Train” it is a winner. The protagonist, Rachel Watson, lives outside London and is divorced, but not happily. She longs to get back with her ex-husband, Tom, but he is now married .

  • Don’t let these free library services remain a secret Danielle Schapaugh

    Psst ... I have a secret to tell you. There are free services at the library that you don’t even suspect. For starters, Manhattan Public Library has a high-quality digital flatbed scanner. Users can scan documents, photos, articles or even .

  • ‘Map of Betrayal’ offers sympathetic, sad story of spy

    “A Map of Betrayal” is a sympathetic, even sad, story of a Chinese man who was reasonably well placed in the CIA and spied for his country for decades. It’s also the story of his American daughter’s effort .

  • ‘Small as an Elephant’ big on imagination

    Jennifer Richard Jacobson never fails to offer her readers hope, especially when the lives of an 11-year-old boy and his “spinning” mom couldn’t get more dangerous, unpredictable, ridiculously funny, complex and lonely. Jacobson has written a heart-warming story about .

  • Story suggestions for National Tell a Fairy-Tale Day

    Feb. 26 is National Tell a Fairy-Tale Day. I know you already know them, but in case you need some inspiration for your Thursday bedtime story, come visit our Fairy Tale and Folklore Neighborhood in the Children’s room. Look for .





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