• More WWI spy shenanigans

    “One Man’s Flag” is just as its cover describes it, “A novel of espionage during the First World War.” It’s also a love story between individuals who can’t seem to be on the same side, and it’.

  • Unlikely friends face trials of high school

    You know that high school classmate you wouldn’t be caught dead associating with? Given the right cocktail of bad choices, dangerous circumstances and shared terror, they just might become the person you’re clinging to for dear life. “Rebel, .

  • Alter takes readers on Himalayan spy adventure

    Mussoorie, an anonymous town along the Indian border with Tibet, has a curious population breakdown. It draws a modest number of tourists, has a military detachment and is home to a number of Brits, some of whom have been there .

  • Read about plant, animal additions for your yard Janet.ulrey.librarian

    Gardening is a wonderful way to gain joy from the outside world. The visual beauty of flowers and plants is pleasing to the eye, but when a butterfly drops in for a visit, another dimension is added to heighten your .

  • Exile leads to mystery for Chinese librarian

    Recently participants in the Manhattan Public Library’s BookTalk spring reading program discussed what keeps readers interested in mysteries. Three main elements were identified — the challenge of solving the crime, the fascination with the geographical, political or historical aspects of .

  • Inspiring heroine takes on pre-WWII rescue mission

    The year is 1938, and Maisie Dobbs, a British woman, is a widow whose husband was killed while test-flying an aircraft some years earlier. Maisie was pregnant at the time, and because of grief and trauma, lost her baby not long .

  • All that jazz at the Manhattan Public Library Pecoraro

    Celebrate International Jazz Day this April 30. In 2011, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), designated April 30 as International Jazz Day. Its purpose was to bring communities, schools, artists, historians, academics and jazz enthusiasts from all over the world .

  • ‘Criminal’ yet another interesting Kevin Costner film

    The new spy movie “Criminal” is the latest in a run of interesting films featuring Kevin Costner. It is the latest entertainment to use the story some of us know as “Flowers for Algernon” and some of us know as “.

  • Memory loss leads to unlikely romance

    “The Things We Keep” is an unlikely story of new beginnings. Anna Forster, 38, has early onset Alzheimer’s, and because of her disease, it has become too dangerous for her to live on her own. She now is a resident .

  • ‘Weirdo fiction’: meaning, humor, complexity Danielle Schapaugh

    Not often will you find a witty, southern gothic, heartfelt, fiercely loving, mystery story featuring Hindu mythology, but that’s just what Joshilyn Jackson’s latest novel “The Opposite of Everyone” has to offer. Jackson is one of my favorite .

  • Klassen examines hippie culture, legacy

    This fascinating book is both a history of the San Francisco hippie movement of 1965 to ‘67 and, more importantly, an argument that this movement was the genesis of several multimillion-dollar industries as well as fashion and lifestyle trends.  The author .

  • Espionage, travel writing collide in ‘The Travelers’

    As its title suggests, “The Travelers” is a novel about travel and travel writers. It’s also a novel of espionage. Will Rhodes writes for Travelers magazine in what many scribes would consider a perfect job. He’s paid to .


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