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Posted: 04 October 2013 08:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 46 ]
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Alright, wise ass.  Whenever he was a cowboy.  Not a lawyer, not a canoe-paddling explorer.

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Posted: 04 October 2013 09:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 47 ]
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You specified GENRE. Are you saying that How the WEST was Won is not a western? The Man who Shot Liberty Valance is NOT a western? TSK TSK…I believe both of those would be considered by most…westerns…and, I’ll bet John Ford would have concurred….:-)
Watch out for that word “all”.

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Posted: 05 October 2013 04:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 48 ]
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So.. you’re saying THAT’S the reason you didn’t get it?

OK, westerns.  When Henry Fonda showed up to start shooting Once Upon a Time in the West, he brought some… enhancements… that he thought would make him fit his evil character better. Sergia Leone made him get rid of them.  What were they?

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Posted: 05 October 2013 07:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 49 ]
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No, I wouldn’t have gotten that anyway…just pointing out that the question was wrong.
contacts?

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Posted: 05 October 2013 07:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 50 ]
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Good job.  Now did you know that, or did I give it away with my question?

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Posted: 05 October 2013 07:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 51 ]
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Read a Fonda biography not long ago which mentioned it, and your word “enhancements” triggered the memory.
Here’s an easy one for you. What happened to sever the working relationship between James Stewart and Alfred Hitchcock?

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Posted: 05 October 2013 09:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 52 ]
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No idea.  They did quite a few together.  They were complete opposite personalities.  Spat?  Too many takes?

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Posted: 05 October 2013 10:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 53 ]
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Actually, they weren’t that opposite.  Stewart could be very contrary…quite unlike his lovable screen persona. He demanded high salaries. He was one of the first to demand a cut from a films gross, and he could be very petty at times. You don’t achieve the rank of…I think he was at least a colonel and be all that sweet.
He, of course, did several Hitchcock movies, but was incensed when Hitchcock cast Cary Grant as Roger Thornhill in North by Northwest.  He had made it clear that he wanted the role, but Hitchcock told him he was too old. This infuriated him. Ironically Cary Grant was several years older, but had a younger hairpiece. They did not work together again. Stewart…or anyone…would have been a better choice in my opinion. Grant, again, my opinion, was a terrible actor except for light romantic comedies. Like Jim Carrey, he mugged for the cameras. He was great in Topper and A Touch of Mink and a few others but he ruined Arsenic and Old Lace with his phony face-making. His acting in North by Northwest borders on the Ham. The script saved that movie. It is still not one of my favorite Hitchcock movies, nor is Vertigo. I lean towards The Man who Knew too Much.
I did love the house in North by Northwest, but, sadly, it was just a stage set…:-(

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Posted: 05 October 2013 11:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 54 ]
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As an addendum….Hitchcock blamed Stewart for the fact that Vertigo was a box office flop, saying he was too old.  Of course, he is the one who cast him. Hitchcock was a petty little tyrant and he cast Grant out of spite and in retribution for the failure of Vertigo, which, ironically is now ranked by some as “the greatest movie ever”. I don’t think that is true but, it is a good movie, and, certainly Stewart did not ruin it. Hitchcock had a great instinct for plots, but, in my opinion, was not a great director.
Want to play “best movies” ever? I challenged Ned to this but after his humiliation over the best rock songs ever (I correctly named Bohemian Rhapsody), he refused.
Here is my list:
#1 The Sting ( the most carefully constructed and executed movies of all time)
#2 One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest
#3 Paper Moon (much overlooked by critics)
#4 Deer Hunter
#5 It’s a Wonderful Life
Now I change my rankings from time to time, because this is so subjective.  Sort of depends on the mood you are in. Others that make my top ten usually include Tootsie, Arthur, 12 Angry Men, Inherit the Wind and Please Don’t eat the Daisies…hahaha
As you might have noted, I am partial to comedies…not most modern comedies which involve too many bodily functions and throwing dogs out of windows. Those are targeted toward 13 yr olds who find farting hilarious.
How about your list, and Stacia, I would like to hear yours as well and anybody else who wants to participate.

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Posted: 05 October 2013 09:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 55 ]
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Are you kidding? Grant is exceptional in North by Northwest. You want to see a bad performance, watch Jimmy Stewart in Hitchcock’s Rope. He’s nervous and clearly uncomfortable with the material. Ray Milland would have been terrific, though maybe a touch too smooth for the role.

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Posted: 05 October 2013 10:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 56 ]
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I couldn’t possibly do a proper Top 5 list, but I can list some of my favorites:

Touch of Evil
The Bad Sleep Well
Mulholland Dr.
The Third Man
The Master
Warlock
Citizen Kane
Blood Simple
The Innocents
The Haunting
Rope
The General
So Dark the Night
Beat the Devil
Point Blank

That’s 15 already, I could probably do another 20 more, with the caveat that I haven’t seen a lot of really fine films and my list would change—probably grow—as the years go on. I think the list I have right now is pretty pedestrian, honestly.

ETA: See, I forgot Hitch’s Shadow of a Doubt, another fave, and I’m even doing a blogathon entry on it at the end of the month. And Johnny Guitar. And Under the Volcano…

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Posted: 06 October 2013 07:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 57 ]
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I have no way of listing best movies.  I can only name the ones I can watch over and over… that stand up under many viewings… except for Private Ryan which is SO disturbing that I haven’t watched it for years.  For the record, Michael, I saw Cuckoo’s Nest 6 times at the Varsity. 

Top Ten

The Philadelphia Story
The Color Purple
Saving Private Ryan
A Fish Called Wanda
To Kill a Mockingbird
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels
Bad Day at Black Rock
The Cooler
Fargo
The Lady Eve


wait, I’ve got some favorites about Los Angeles that I’ve watched many times
Chinatown
LA Confidential
Mulholland Falls

 

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Posted: 06 October 2013 08:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 58 ]
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I never cared too much about Saving Ryan’s Privates. It is too gory and then turns silly and tedious. I would agree with you that the “best” movies are ones you can watch over and over. I have always been a great fan of Mary Poppins since I was in college and there were others I could have put on the list that I forgot about which is precisely why no one can do a “best” list.  Way too subjective…a matter of personal taste. Personally, I am not a big fan of war movies with the exception of Tora Tora Tora which involves more plot than war. I hate those war movies where seventy per cent is rat-a-tat tat. As I have gotten older, I tend to prefer nice old comedies…another favorite I forgot to mention…The Egg and I…Now that Nora Ephron is gone, I probably won’t watch many of the newer ones. My Blue Heaven was and is a favorite.
Stacia,
I would not argue with your list of movies.  Most, however, are a bit dark for my personal taste…:-)
We will agree to disagree about Grant. I think he is great in light comedies with the notable exception being Arsenic and Old Lace, which, even he admitted was the worst performance in his career. I’ll have to watch Rope again.  Haven’t seen it for a long time but I vaguely recall sharing the same views about Stewart in the role. Stewart, by the way would have been perfect in Arsenic with his bumbling charm. Grant simply mugged his way through the role.  As he put it…“Over the top”

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Posted: 06 October 2013 08:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 59 ]
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Well, I’ve never cared too much for It’s a Wunnerful Life… except for the little fellow who played the angel. He was hilarious… all the else was sappy tripe.

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Posted: 06 October 2013 08:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 60 ]
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The public generally agreed with you when the movie was released. As a result of poor reviews, the movie company let the copyright expire on it, which eventually turned it into a classic because TV networks could show it for free.  It was in the public domain…so, they showed it all the time from Thanksgiving through Christmas. Henry Travers was the angel and, I agree that the movie was a bit on the sappy side, but I like it. As I said, I now prefer that little fantasy world of the old comedies over stark realism.

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