I have some nutty, nutty “friends”
Posted: 27 May 2013 11:40 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Most are on facebook.  They get very emotional about this holiday.  Most suffer from PMS or PTTB or LBPS,  or whatever acronym describes veterans who returned from battle nuttier than fruitcakes.  They, of course , blame this on their war experiences.  In most cases, it has been my experience, that they were nutty before the war experience.  If they weren’t, and without a draft, why in the world would they sign up for the army?...or any military branch? In some cases, I understand..jail is not a pleasant alternative…actually, I am not sure about that…
I really wish that they would stop whining.  As is typical of Americans, we make up new diseases…ADD, etc., and now this psstd ....or whatever they call it….Funny it wasn’t prevalent after WWII.  Of course, in that war, we were actually fighting for something.

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Posted: 27 May 2013 05:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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A bit harsh.  The PTSD thing has just evolved from the Civil War – Soldier’s Heart or Irritable Heart,  WWI – Shell Shock, to WWII/Korea Combat Fatigue, to Stress Response Syndrome in Vietnam.

It is interesting that even the VA may agree with your assessment of preexisting condition:

After the Vietnam War, countless veterans were diagnosed with “stress response syndrome” — but the VA declared that if the problem lasted more than six months after the soldiers returned home, then it obviously was a pre-existing condition and had nothing to do with their wartime service. And thus, it was no longer covered.

Whatever history has called PTSD, it has been present after all wars to include WWII.  But maybe it was just not covered as extensively by the safety net, or maybe it was not fashionable to make a big deal about it since so many millions served.  I do not think PTSD has anything to do with the reason that a war is fought.  I think folks can be for or against the war and that has little impact on the trauma that may or may not produce PTSD.

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Posted: 27 May 2013 06:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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What bothers me Wynn, is that many of the folks I know who get all bothered were in the service, but never saw combat.  And I will stick with my original position that many of those who do suffer, had problems before they VOLUNTEERED to go to combat. People in WWII and Korea and Vietnam did not generally volunteer.  Those who did, we have a name for.  We call them “Marines” Ooh-Rah (Not sure of the spelling on that).

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Posted: 28 May 2013 07:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I would think that the PTSD or whatever should be related to some actual combat.  But who knows maybe running those buffers and spit shinning those jump boots at Fort Benning can do damage or maybe the hurry up and wait process of the military is the real cause of it all.

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Posted: 29 May 2013 03:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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When I worked for the VA I saw the records of quite a few soldiers who didn’t see combat but who had PTSD. Many were in medical services far from the front. A couple were WWII veterans who worked at the Bikini Atoll site. Lots worked with explosives and weaponry, tanks, etc. A few were soldiers attacked in some manner by other soldiers on their base. In all the time I worked with the VA I never once came across someone who was simply a stateside clerk (or similar) who had PTSD.  I very much doubt, after filing and compiling several hundred Compensation and Pension Examinations, that someone who didn’t have PTSD would be given a diagnosis of PTSD simply on their say-so.

PTSD was indeed prevalent after WWII. Heck, the villains in every Hollywood movie in the late 40s and 1950s were guys screwed up by the war. Perhaps you’ve heard of John Huston’s Let There Be Light documentary, or the Oscar-winning Best Years of Our Lives. After WWI, shell shock (one of the old names for PTSD) was a huge issue, so much so it’s cliche—the UK alone treated 80,000 cases of shell shock. Wynn already mentioned earlier examples. And diarist Samuel Pepys wrote about PTSD-type issues back in the 1600s, when soldiers coming back from war were often considered too messed up to function properly in society. Plato has a famous reference to “only the dead have seen the end of war,” in a screed written about how veterans behave after war, and Socrates wrote plays about what we now call PTSD.

If anything is invented here, it’s not PTSD, it’s your very convenient groups of friends who always manage to prove whatever resentful, petty little point you’re trying to make. You resent everyone all the time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including (or especially) on holidays.

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Posted: 29 May 2013 08:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I admit I was too harsh.  I don’t deny the existence of this disorder. And, perhaps the people I know are anomalies.  I was in a very bad mood after receiving whining e-mails from friends who_claim_ to be suffering from this, although I have no evidence that they were so diagnosed. They do this on every veteran-related holiday. One of them starts blubbering every time he drives past a flag pole.
My apologies to those who actually suffer from this disorder and are not just people wanting attention. Mea Culpa.

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