Ball’s Lunch
Posted: 15 October 2012 05:47 PM   [ Ignore ]
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It was a small diner in El Dorado, kansas.  That was my first teaching job and I lived in the top floor of a building which was just across the street from Ball’s Lunch.  They had only two entrees.  Veal sandwiches with chili, and veal sandwiches with relish.  The “veal” was somewhat like deep fried cardboard, but, the toppings were fantastic.  I used to walk across the street late at night and get ten of each (they were only 15 cents), then I would go back to my apartmenrt and munch down.  It was the best time of my life.  I am sure it is gone now, but, it was great.

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Posted: 15 October 2012 07:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Sure, in your worldly travels, you’ve seen some really “interesting” dining establishments.  Here in the U.S., most would never believe some of the places we used to think of as “good places to eat”.

Stopped in Olpe, KS one morning for coffee.  Cups already on the table.  One of the crew with me noticed his cup had lipstick residue on the rim and what apppeared to be dried coffee ‘dribbles’.  The waitress arrived at our table with the coffee pot in one hand and a cigarette in the other.  The crew member asked her about the obviously ‘experienced’ coffee cup.  With a disgusted look, she sat the coffee pot down on the table and put the cigarette between her lips.  She proceeded to pull her shirtail out of a pair of pants that might have been special order from Topeak Tent & Awning… yet were a couple sizes too small for the mass they needed to keep contained.  She wiped out the coffee cup with her shirtail, filled it with coffee, and set it back down in front of the worker.  Her attitude easily conveyed that no further complaints would be tolerated.

The Frigid Queen in Herington, KS served up hearty portions of grease and cholesterol.  I doubt the kitchen had ever seen anything close to a health inspection.  But, that was back in the early 70’s. 

In the 60’s, there was a hamburger place across from what is now known as the “East Campus” on Poyntz.  Burgers were 10 for $1.00 and were surprisingly good.  The old Creme Cup at 17th & Yuma served delightful burgers and fries.  Charco’s, out by the Sky Vue Drive In had awesome burgers and fried chicken.  Dog & Suds was better known for its “delicious” car hops than its quizine. 

The worst “urban myth”... I hope… was a cafe between 2nd and 3rd on Poyntz.  They said the cook was too large to get through the undersized doorway to the restroom.  (That was long before ADA requirements on access.)  It was told that she had her own “thunder bucket” in the corner of the kitchen she would use, as needed, and return to cooking.  I only frequented that restaurant once, before hearing that rumor… and never again returned.

No matter the sanitary conditions… or lack thereof… we survived.  Didn’t often hear of E Coli outbreaks like we do today.  I still think our immune systems were better prepared to fight off the occasional intake of bacteria than they are today with the sterile enviornments we try to exist in.

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Posted: 16 October 2012 09:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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nick’s.  downtown brookings.  homemade buns.  fresh hamburger fried in grease.  a slider for the ages.  anyone who went to school at state ate at nick’s, including paul foltz and me.  still there.  renewed the experience this past summer.  yummy.

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Posted: 16 October 2012 10:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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We had one of those ten for a dollar hamburger joints in Hutchinson where I grew up.  It was in a small shack on second street.  They were very tasty.  Every Saturday, my best friend and I would go and get five dollars worth and then head to the Iris Drive-In Theatre.  Fifty cents a car, and you got four movies.  They were not first run, but many were excellent movies.  If the movie was bad, we just talked until the next one came on.  As I remember, there were a lot of Doris Day movies intermingled with horror movies and Christopher Lee.  The best part was the hamburgers…and Doris Day.

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Posted: 16 October 2012 10:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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always went to double features as a kid in sioux city.  remember it costing 25 cents, but that could be high.  never wanted to miss the serial that ran from week to week between shows, rather like today’s daytime tv, i guess.  flash gordon and others.

films i remember dealt with cowboys (like roy rogers), horror (the maze) and war.  lots of war stuff following on the greatest generation.  :-)

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Posted: 16 October 2012 11:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Boy, it is great that we can finally reminisce about the good old days without being interrupted by some snotty kid who thinks he or she knows something we don’t.  We know it all.  Let’s keep this forum to ourselves.  No need to include the riff-raff, who are merely distracting…and not very smart at all.  Older folks rule, young uns’ drool.  See ya around Kids…hahaha

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Posted: 16 October 2012 11:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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hadley, they’re at the movies.  keeping in the dark.  it’s where they can control themselves and others.  don’t be so sensitive.  it’s not about you, man.

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