I guess I am going to have to go vegetarian
Posted: 14 February 2013 09:39 AM   [ Ignore ]
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About the only affordable things in the meat departments are chicken gizzards.  I like them.  I have a recipe I got from a waiter at Stephensons in Kansas City.  Basically, you boil them for about five hours and then simmer them in BBQ sauce.  Quite tasty, but not something you want on a daily basis.
The rest of the meat has gone out of sight.  Two piddly little KC strips…$19…I won’t pay it. Tough round steak…around $10…a box of little chicken strips…$9…Imagine, $10 for a couple pounds of hamburger (if you go to the store, you won’t have to imagine) I won’t even talk about the seafood which is even worse.
I eat about 50% vegetarian as it is, so it won’t hurt me to go all the way.  I think I will whip me up some Brussel Sprouts with cheese sauce for dinner…maybe a salad on the side.

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Posted: 14 February 2013 10:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Brussel sprouts w/cheese sauce… Yum!!!  Love ‘em!  Don’t get between me and my veggies!  I live in Manhattan, land of ‘fruits and nuts’.  But, I’m a veggie lover at heart.

Grew up eating the entire chicken, including heart, gizzard, liver… even the piece that went over the fence last… the backbone/tail.  My Mother always wanted to pick at that part of the chicken.  Gizzards and livers are somewhat of a delicicy, today.  If folks could watch the sand and gravel being cleaned out of a gizzard they might not be quite as delicious.

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Posted: 14 February 2013 10:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Larry,
That’s why you boil them for five hours, rinse and smother in BBQ sauce.  Tender and clean.  Melt in your mouth. I remember growing up, before they trimmed that big ring of fat off the side of the steak.  My father fried steaks and that was his favorite part. I wouldn’t eat it, so he would peel it off my steak and tell me “You’re missing the best part”.  He was also an avid fisherman, and so I would spit out bones from catfish.  “There’s no bones in there.” he would proclaim.  I would say “What’s this?” holding up one of many tiny bones.  This usually earned me a slap up the side of the head.  To this day, I will not touch catfish.  I remember that my mother would always put out a loaf of white bread…just in case a bone got stuck in your throat.  I think that was standard practice back then.
To my best remembrance, there was never a vegetable served in our house, unless you count mashed potatoes. My father was very strict about that.  I doubt if he ever heard of a Brussel Sprout. Well, we did have corn on the cob, now that I remember more clearly…because we had a cornfield.

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Posted: 15 February 2013 03:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I’m from southern Missouri so I’ve eaten about every thing that is edible. Didn’t care for deer, personally, and scrambled brains and eggs were pretty nasty. Snake was good, though. We also had white bread out with the catfish for that exact reason. My mother’s catfish was the best ever. The lady could not cook, except for two things: Fried catfish and homemade apple pie.

Meat prices are outrageous, especially if you want the real stuff. Grass fed steaks that taste like “regular” steaks I grew up with are $20-$30 a pound. Even catfish is expensive! Pfft. The cheaper meats aren’t actually cheaper because they’re injected with “natural flavorings” that mean you’re being charged for either salt water brine or “pink slime” instead of actual meat. We stretch meat out as much as possible, but the husband insists on having it every night. He’s cranky about having to cut back, but there’s nothing we can do. We just can’t afford it anymore.

All that said, the east side “super” store had some pretty cheap sirloin tip tonight, and some Tyson brand chicken breasts were a good price. For about $15 we got 3 meals worth of meat, which isn’t cheap but it’s a bargain compared to the usual prices. If you’re shopping this morning Michael, you might want to check it out.

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Posted: 15 February 2013 05:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Wife picked up some of Ray’s cooked ribs for $4.00 More ribs in that container than the two of us could eat.  Baked potato and some veggies, the two of us had a pretty fabulous Valentine’s dinner for about $3/each. 

We try to watch for coupons for all our shopping.  Picked up the Sunday Mercury, this past weekend, that had a big notice on the front page of something like $4,000 worth of coupons inside.  No coupons, and no Parade.  Gonna have to find somewhere else to buy my Sunday paper.  Don’t know if all the newstand papers are the ‘stripped down version’ or not.

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Posted: 15 February 2013 08:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Stacia,
Thanks for the tip.  I went there and picked up a couple of things although I hate the store.  Not for any moral outrage…I don’t like the layout.  Same as the new Dillons.  I like aisles that run in the same direction.  I don’t like walking a circle to get from point A to point B. Your comment about your mother made me laugh.  My mother was a lovely professional woman, but she couldn’t cook worth a damn. Luckily, my father was a professional chef and baker and he handled most of the evening meals.  My mother, like yours had two dishes that she did well.  Chicken and noodles…real chicken and noodles from scratch, and fried chicken. My friends tell me that I am an excellent cook, but ironically I can’t do either of those dishes right.  I know why I can’t do the chicken and noodles-you need a pressure cooker and I am afraid of those.  As far as fried chicken…I just can’t do it.  I like a thick crust…it either falls off or the crust is fine and the chicken half cooked.  This may have something to do with not using an iron skillet and lard that my mother used. Every once in a while, I try again and you can see the smiles creeping across the kitten’s faces because they know they will end up with most of it.

Larry,
Lately, I have found that the pre-done meals, are, in the long run cheaper.  I buy those giant hero sandwiches at Wal Mart for about five dollars.  One of those will give me about five meals and they are pretty good. I can get three meals off a $9 bucket of Chester’s Chicken and it is much better than what I cook.  I have tried those ribs and they are pretty good.  I can’t make a pizza from scratch for what Wal Mart sells the pre-made, which are pretty decent, if you add a few veggies, which you can get cheaply at Dillons.
I have taken to buying my hamburger at Wal Mart as well.  If you go in the morning they will have mark-downs.  I buy a pound of 96% lean for $3.70. Lucky that you like veggies.  If you haven’t discovered this yet, go to the north wall of Dillons East and they have pre-packaged salads and veggies.  Every day there are mark-downs. Just this morning I bought a large bag of cauliflower and broccoli for $1.29…already chopped up so I don’t have little white and green beads all over the prep table, and much cheaper than buying these items whole.

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Posted: 17 February 2013 08:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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It’s funny you should mention that about chicken and noodles. I’m a pretty good cook, and a few months ago I made tuna noodle casserole for the first time. Thought it would be easy. Had it with salad and some rolls. Husband and I took one bite of the casserole, carefully put our salads back in the fridge and the rolls in a bag, then drove to Burger King. It’s the only dinner I’ve ever made that we had to toss out. Out of a good 20 years of cooking I guess that’s a good average, but still.

Fried chicken is better in cast iron and shortening (I don’t use lard). The trick is to fry up the crust on a reasonably low-ish temp (just below medium), then put the chicken on a rack over a cookie sheet and finish it off in the oven. Mom used to cook it all on the stove but I have never learned how to do that without having the same problems you do.

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Posted: 17 February 2013 09:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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It is funny, because two nights ago.  I screwed up the same dish.  I don’t know how we did it.  It’s pretty simple. Cats wouldn’t even eat it.
By the way, I don’t know if you ever have occasion to go to Clay Center, but the Rays there usually has some good deals on meat. I do a lot of my meat buying there.  Of course, I am only 14 miles away.

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Posted: 17 February 2013 12:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I forgot to mention.  My dad made a great tuna/noodle casserole.  We had it a lot.  Of course that was when tuna was cheap and potato chips were cheap…he used crushed potato chips.  Now, if you wanted any good amount of tuna, and made it with potato chips, and some cheese, you are looking at an expensive meal.  We also used to have a lot of ham hock and beans.  Priced ham hocks lately?  The stores used to virtually give those away.
One of my problems is that many of the recipes that I cook are best made in large proportions, and because there is just me, I end up tossing at least half.  I picked up a 10lb turkey at Wal Mart a few weeks ago on sale for $5. The cats will end up with half of it, because after a few days, I tire of eating it. Turkey is still one of the best buys per pound of food.  If you are clever and creative, you can get 20 meals off a ten pound turkey.  I use some of the leftovers for enchiladas. A tip from my father…bake all birds breast down.  Then the white meat absorbs the fat and is edible. If you insist on the Norman Rockwell version, then flip it over the last thirty minutes.

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