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Heavy Rain

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Storms rake area and state

By The Mercury

Manhattan and a wide swath of central Kansas dodged a spate of tornadoes Saturday afternoon and evening, part of a large bad weather outbreak that spread across the Midwest.

At deadline, the closest call to serious local damage took place near the small communities of northern Riley County. A tornado that originally touched down down in rural Dickinson County passed through Clay County before apparently dissipating a few miles   west of Leonardville. The storm prompted the sounding of sirens and the formal issuance of a warning. The latter sent residents to shelters in that city as well as Riley and Randolph.

A second storm carrying large hail sent residents of Dwight, Alta Vista and Alma to shelters shortly before 10 p.m. 

It was one of several tornadic storms along a wide path Saturday from west-central Kansas up through Salina, and Abilene.

More than a dozen possible tornadoes were reported as forecasters warned residents across the nation’s midsection to brace for “life-threatening” weather.

But the most dangerous weather was expected to come Saturday night into Sunday morning. National Weather Service officials issued a stern warning for residents across a wide area to prepare for active overnight storms that could spawn fast-moving tornadoes.

On Saturday afternoon, an apparent tornado took down barns, outbuildings and large trees in southeast Nebraska. Johnson County emergency director Clint Strayhorn said he was still trying to determine how long the twister was on the ground and how much damage it did.

In Salina, tornado sirens sounded after a possible tornado was spotted nearby. National Weather Service meteorologist Mike Scott also said tornadoes were reported in the central and western Kansas counties of Pratt, Stafford, Rush and Hodgeman. There were reports of a home damaged in Rush County and an old schoolhouse in Hodgeman County. There also were reports of downed power lines and trees in Russell County.

Sharon Watson, spokeswoman for the Kansas Division of Emergency Management, said officials will continue to monitor the storm into early Sunday.

“We will be working closely to make sure we can help any counties that will need our assistance tonight,” she said.

Michelann Ooten, an official with the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management, said: “This could go into, certainly, to overnight situations, which is always of immense concern to us.”

Storms that hit during the overnight hours can be more hazardous, as residents may not be able to hear tornado sirens in their sleep or don’t monitor news services as closely. When it’s dark, it’s also more difficult for weather spotters to clearly see funnel clouds or tornadoes.

“The threat isn’t over with tonight, unfortunately. Severe weather is possible again tomorrow from east Texas and Arkansas and up into the Great Lakes,” said Bill Bunting, chief of operations at the Storm Prediction Center, which is part of the National Weather Service.

Tornado sirens sounded across Oklahoma City before dawn Saturday, and at least three possible tornadoes were reported west and north of the city in the central part of the state, Ooten said.

One of the suspected tornadoes in central Oklahoma hit near the small town of Piedmont, and followed a similar path as a tornado last May that killed several people, Mayor Valerie Thomerson said.

Later Saturday, several tornadoes were reported to have touched down in northwestern Oklahoma, causing minor damage. Officials confirmed two tornadoes in Woodward County, one of which damaged an outbuilding and a camper. No injuries were reported.

A tornado also touched down in Woods County, where more than 5,000 people had gathered for a rattlesnake hunt at a state park.

The Storm Prediction Center gave the sobering warning that the outbreak could be a “high-end, life-threatening event.”

It was just the second time in U.S. history that the center issued a high-risk warning more than 24 hours in advance. The first was in April 2006, when nearly 100 tornadoes tore across the southeastern U.S., killing a dozen people and damaging more than 1,000 homes in Tennessee.

It’s possible to issue earlier warnings because improvements in storm modeling and technology are letting forecasters predict storms earlier and with greater confidence, said Chris Vaccaro, a spokesman for the National Weather Service. In the past, people often have had only minutes of warning.









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