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Snuggle up with these heartwarming reads

By Manhattan Public Library

These months after the bustle of the holidays, with a long wait for the warmth of spring, can feel a bit dreary. To ward off the winter blues, sitting down (preferably with a throw blanket and a cup of tea) to a heartwarming book can improve your outlook.

The author of the vastly popular “A Man Called Ove,” Fredrik Backman, has returned with another tale full of heart and hope, “My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry.” At seven years old, Elsa faces the loss of her beloved grandmother and her stories of the Land of Almost-Awake and the Kingdom of Miamas, but she takes on the adventure of delivering her granny’s apology letters.

Through her quest, Elsa learns that support can exist in surprising places and that sometimes fairy tales contain the truths of life.

In the delightful novel “The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend,”by Katarina Bivald, Sara travels from Sweden to Broken Wheel, Iowa, to meet her avid-reader pen pal, Amy.

When she arrives to learn that Amy has just died, she hunkers down in Amy’s house full of books. She’s eventually inspired to open a book store to share her beloved friend’s love of books with her non-reading community, starting a series of subtle changes that will touch the town and Sara forever.

“The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat.” by Edward Kelsey Moore brings to life Odette, Clarice, and Barbara Jean. The lifelong friends have met for years at their favorite local diner to eat the best food in town, gossip, and take care of one another.

Full of humor and unforgettable characters, Moore’s novel affirms the value of friendship, community, humor and a good piece of pie.

Ivan Doig takes us on a 1951 road trip in “Last Bus to Wisdom.” Eleven year- old Donal Cameron is shipped off to an aunt in Wisconsin when the grandmother raising him in Montana has to have surgery. Aunt Kate is nothing like his sweet Gran, and he can’t seem to get on her good side.

After Donal pushes Kate too far, she sends him back to the authorities in Montana and her hen-pecked husband, Herman the German, takes the opportunity to escape with the boy.

The late Doig was known for his outstanding abilities as a storyteller and this humorous road novel demonstrates his mastery. Lynne Cox was the first person to swim both the Straits of Magellan and around the Cape of Good Hope, but she faces completely new challenges in her memoir “Swimming in the Sink: An Episode of the Heart.” Following the deaths of her parents and her beloved dog, she is diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, which sets her back severely.

Her book shares her struggle toward recovery and her recognition of the importance of her community.

“Rescue Road: One Man, Thirty Thousand Dogs, and a Million Miles on the Last Hope Highway,” by Peter Zheutlin tells the story of Greg Mahle’s mission to bring dogs from Southern shelters and find loving homes for them in the North.

The author traveled with Mahle and shares the tales of the road trip, including the awful conditions that some animals experience and the inspiring people who dedicate their lives to saving them.

Rabbi Susan Silverman examines the meaning of identity, faith, and family in her autobiography “Casting Lots: Creating a Family in a Beautiful, Broken World.” Silverman chronicles her childhood in a loving family that faced difficulties together.

It also tells of the creation of her own family as she and her husband add to their three daughters by adopting two sons from Ethiopia. Her sharp sense of humor shines through this thoughtful perusal of a fascinating life.

Horace Mann once said “A house without books is like a room without windows.” A heartwarming read is the perfect way to open your mind and let some light into the long months of winter.









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